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Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Brown Magic Clica Sureno Gang Busted in Oregon and Idaho

This is almost in our backyard. This gang is not as well known as other Mexican gangs, the Mexican Mafia or the drug cartels. This is still an excellent haul and I am sure this is just the tip of the iceberg. They do plenty of dirty and nasty work.

Draft of Sureno members' body art.
Photo: KnowGangs.com
Operation Black Magic Nails 30 Latino Gang Members
By Jim Kouri: Thirty members of the "Brown Magic Clica," a Sureño street gang active in western Idaho and eastern Oregon, were indicted in federal and state courts in separate proceedings last week, according to an FBI report obtained by the National Association of Chiefs of Police. A literal translation of Sureño is "southerner." When dealing with Mexican-American or Chicano gangs this refers to Hispanic gangs in Southern California.

It may also include gangs who imitate the Sureño style outside of California, or are part of the "Sureño Movement". These gangs differ in size, tradition and sophistication. In Southern California, the gang structure is very loose and the structure is more horizontal than the vertical hierarchy of some East Coast gangs, according to gang expert Gabe Morales.

Most Sureños may not personally know any Mexican Mafia members, but will still put the “13”, for the 13th letter "M", after there name as a matter of respect. Sureños are not so much foot soldiers for the Mexican Mafia as they are a sort of "farm team" from which the Mexican Mafia may recruit the best and most feared ones, according to Morales.

A federal grand jury in Boise indicted 13 people on March 9 in three separate indictments for conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise, murder in aid of racketeering, attempted murder in aid of racketeering, assault with a deadly weapon in aid of racketeering, conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, distribution of controlled substances, and unlawful possession of a firearm.

In addition, 11 defendants are charged in the racketeering indictment; two others are charged individually, one with conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance, the other with unlawful possession of a firearm. Meanwhile, a state grand jury in Canyon County indicted 18 people on March 9 for recruiting criminal gang members. One of the state defendants was indicted federally.

The indictments, which were unsealed by the courts Wednesday morning, are the result of a three-year Treasure Valley Metro Violent Crime Task Force investigation named "Operation Black Magic," which focused on the criminal activity of members of the Brown Magic Clica (clique of Sureno-13) gang over the past five years.

The defendants named in the three federal indictments are Salvador Apodaca, 24, and Amando Torres, 27, of Pendleton, Oregon; Alfredo Castro, 35, Adam Gomez, 23, Adelaido Gomez, 26, Juan Jimenez, 27, and Ruben Nungaray, 30, all of Boise, Idaho; Oscar Garcia, 24, of Umatilla, Oregon; Juan Gonzalez, 26, and Mathew Grover, 22, of Cottonwood, Idaho; Crista Lara, 23, and Samson Torres, 23, of Ontario, Oregon; and Jessie Rodriguez, 26, of Nyssa, Oregon.

Several suspects are residing illegally in the U.S.
The charge of conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise is punishable by up to 20 years' imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000, and up to five years' supervised release. The charge of murder in aid of racketeering is punishable by up to life imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000, and up to five years' supervised release.

The charge of attempted murder in aid of racketeering is punishable by up to 10 years' imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000, and up to three years' supervised release. The charge of assault with a deadly weapon in aid of racketeering is punishable by up to 20 years' imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000, and up to three years' supervised release.

The charges of conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance and distribution of a controlled substance carry a minimum of five years' imprisonment, up to 40 years' imprisonment, a fine of up to $2,000,000, and not less than four years' supervised release. The charge of unlawful possession of a firearm carries up to 10 years' imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000, and up to three years' supervised release.>

The defendants named in the state indictment are Hector Almarez, 30, Adelaido Gomez, 26, Luis Nungaray, 24, and Isaac Villareal, 25, all of Boise; Michael Carrasco, 28, Jose Jimenez, 27, Martin Navarro, 28, and Cesar Salinas, 28, of Nyssa; Ulises Cisneros, 25, of Meridian, Idaho; Paul Espinoza, 20, Nicholas Gomez, 19, Ricardo Martinez, 24, and David Perales, 20, of Ontario; Miguel Gallegos, 26, and Javier Gomez, 26, of Vale, Oregon; Juan Esteban Gonzalez, 24, of Nampa, Idaho; Jonathan Lopez Villa, 25, of Caldwell, Idaho; and Gonzalo Garcia-Torres, 26, address unknown.

The charge of conspiracy to recruit gang members carries a maximum punishment of up to 10 years' imprisonment, and a fine of up to $25,000.

"These indictments underscore the collaborative efforts of federal, state, and local law enforcement and prosecutor's offices to combat gang crime in Idaho," said U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson. "We will continue to use every available resource and to work together to take down the violent street gangs that damage our communities."

The federal racketeer influenced corrupt organizations (RICO) law prohibits individuals from participating, or conspiring to participate, in the conduct of an enterprise through a pattern of racketeering activity. An enterprise is defined as any individual, partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity, and any union or group of individuals associated in fact although not a legal entity. Racketeering activity is defined as specified criminal acts, including murder, arson, distribution of controlled substances, and intimidation and retaliation against witnesses.

The Idaho gang recruitment law prohibits individuals from knowingly soliciting, inviting, encouraging, or otherwise causing a person to actively participate in a criminal gang; or from knowingly using force, threats, violence, or intimidation directed at any person, or by the infliction of bodily injury upon any person, to actively participate in a criminal gang.

"Gang recruitment is an insidious crime that weaves its tentacles through our schools, our parks, and our neighborhoods," according to Bryan Taylor, Canyon County Prosecuting Attorney. "Gangs succeed by distorting the values of our culture and by perverting the meaning of 'family,' and that's a fight that law enforcement can only win by standing together in partnership with each other, and with the community."
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Jim Kouri CPP, formerly Fifth Vice-President, is currently a Board Member of the National Association of Chiefs of Police and he's a columnist for Examiner.com and New Media Alliance. In addition, he's a blogger for the Cheyenne, Wyoming Fox News Radio affiliate KGAB. He's former chief at a New York City housing project in Washington Heights nicknamed "Crack City" by reporters. He served as director of public safety at a New Jersey university and director of security for several major organizations. He's also served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country. Kouri writes for many police and security magazines. He appears regularly as on-air commentator for over 100 TV and radio news and talk shows.
Tags: Jim Kouri, illegal aliens, gangs, Oregon, Idaho, To share the post, click on "Post Link." Please mention / link to Blogs for Borders. Thanks!

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